baptisms:

the fact that people HONESTLY think that women’s colleges opening their doors to trans women would lead to cis men pretending to be trans women in order to get into a women’s college and do god knows what is fucking mind boggling 

you’ve been watching too many straight to dvd college comedies 

(via sirgrumpygills)

1,631 notes

elinj:

It’s a Janelle Monae kind of day.

elinj:

It’s a Janelle Monae kind of day.

(via fyeahjanellemonae)

141 notes

#Janelle Monae

#art

#illustration

I didn’t exchange any bodily fluids with anyone, so I’m not worried about it. I’m much more likely to be mistakenly killed by a police officer in this country than to be killed by Ebola, even if you were in the same bridal shop.

3,572 notes

#where is the lie

#THERE IS NO LIE

#shots fired

#oooohhhhhhhhhhhh

evandahm:

Mark Trail and the Shade-Wolf. Drawn for Monster Milk's Funny Pages anthology-zine.

evandahm:

Mark Trail and the Shade-Wolf. Drawn for Monster Milk's Funny Pages anthology-zine.

(via ookamiai)

1,027 notes

#art

#comics

#Mark Trail

carpios:

more celebrities should just be like rihanna in regards to hate

image

(via sirgrumpygills)

311,100 notes

#damn

you play too much

African American Proverb (via blkproverbs)

770 notes

bapgeek2geekbap:

asfadedasmyjeans:

general-stinkyballs:

I’ll just leave this here.

Uh, what the fuck.

Marley Lion’s murderers were tried and convicted 18 months after his death. Meanwhile, Travyon’s murderer was acquitted.  
More info from snopes.com

It is true that the Marley Lion case received little news coverage outside the Charleston area, but the comparison to the Trayvon Martin case is something of a false equivalency. In the Trayvon Martin case, there was never any doubt as to the identity of his killer (George Zimmerman), yet several weeks elapsed before the shooter was charged with a crime and taken into custody — a fact which created controversy and fostered the public perception (correct or not) that the case would never have been adjudicated had it not been widely publicized in the media, and that the race of the victim was a significant issue in the decision about whether to prosecute the shooter (as well as an element of the crime itself). In the 
Marley Lion case, the identity of the killer(s) was initially unknown until likely suspects were determined through police investigation; once those suspects were identified, they were promptly arrested and charged with a multiplicity of crimes, hence Lion’s murder was never associated with a public perception of “justice denied” or the suggestion that his race was an element of either the commission or prosecution of his killing. 
The sad fact is that the U.S. sees about 16,000 homicides per year, a number which precludes more than a scant handful of them receiving national news coverage — generally the ones that do garner national attention involve political or social controversy (Trayvon Martin), lurid details (Jodi Arias), celebrities (O.J. Simpson), or victims such as pregnant women, mothers, and children who are perceived as particularly vulnerable and sympathetic (Laci Peterson, Casey Anthony). Marley Lion’s death, although no less important than anyone else’s, involved none of the extraordinary factors that propel a few select homicide cases into the national spotlight, so — just like thousands of other murder victims — his death remained a local news story. 

And ^^^ that is the difference.

bapgeek2geekbap:

asfadedasmyjeans:

general-stinkyballs:

I’ll just leave this here.

Uh, what the fuck.

Marley Lion’s murderers were tried and convicted 18 months after his death. Meanwhile, Travyon’s murderer was acquitted.  

More info from snopes.com

It is true that the Marley Lion case received little news coverage outside the Charleston area, but the comparison to the Trayvon Martin case is something of a false equivalency. In the Trayvon Martin case, there was never any doubt as to the identity of his killer (George Zimmerman), yet several weeks elapsed before the shooter was charged with a crime and taken into custody — a fact which created controversy and fostered the public perception (correct or not) that the case would never have been adjudicated had it not been widely publicized in the media, and that the race of the victim was a significant issue in the decision about whether to prosecute the shooter (as well as an element of the crime itself). In the 

Marley Lion case, the identity of the killer(s) was initially unknown until likely suspects were determined through police investigation; once those suspects were identified, they were promptly arrested and charged with a multiplicity of crimes, hence Lion’s murder was never associated with a public perception of “justice denied” or the suggestion that his race was an element of either the commission or prosecution of his killing. 

The sad fact is that the U.S. sees about 16,000 homicides per year, a number which precludes more than a scant handful of them receiving national news coverage — generally the ones that do garner national attention involve political or social controversy (Trayvon Martin), lurid details (Jodi Arias), celebrities (O.J. Simpson), or victims such as pregnant women, mothers, and children who are perceived as particularly vulnerable and sympathetic (Laci Peterson, Casey Anthony). Marley Lion’s death, although no less important than anyone else’s, involved none of the extraordinary factors that propel a few select homicide cases into the national spotlight, so — just like thousands of other murder victims — his death remained a local news story. 

And ^^^ that is the difference.

167 notes

#Trayvon Martin

#~the more you know~

#and may I add that trying to de-legitamize one tragedy by propping up another is just one of the grossest sort of displays

#snopes

#saves the day once again

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